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Police FAQs

CodeRED

General

Impounded Vehicles

Outside Assignments

Patrol

CodeRED

The CodeRED database contains information received from public databases, including regional phonebooks. However, no resident should assume that their information is in the system. The home page of the Oro Valley website, www.ovpd.org/code-red, has a link to the CodeRED Community Notification Enrollment page where you can register online. If you cannot register online, you can call 520-229-4927 and speak with one of our communications specialists to complete your registration over the telephone.

• If your contact information has changed and you have not registered your new information.
• If you only have a landline at your residence, the power is out and you did not register an alternate phone number.
• If your line is busy for an extended time and your calls do not forward to voicemail or an answering machine. 
• If you have a privacy manager on your main phone and you did not register an alternate phone number.

Oro Valley will receive a report of undelivered calls and can instruct the CodeRED system to begin another round of calls to busy numbers. It is best to have an alternate phone number in the calling database for these situations.

If the line is busy, CodeRED will try two more times to connect.

Yes, the CodeRED system will leave a message on a machine or on voicemail. The CodeRED system will leave the entire message in one pass.

Make sure you have at least one working corded telephone – and be sure to turn the ringer on. The CodeRED sign-up form allows you to indicate both a primary and alternate phone number. Cell phone and/or work phone numbers can be entered as alternate phone numbers. Both primary and alternate phone numbers will be contacted when a notification is sent.

Listen carefully to the entire message. You will have the option to repeat the message by pressing any key. Do not call 911 for further information unless directed to do so or if you need immediate aid from the police or fire department.

A CodeRED Emergency message will have a caller ID of 866-419-5000. A CodeRED General message will have a caller ID 855-969-4636. We suggest you program both numbers in your cell phone as a “new contact” and use “CodeRED Emergency” and “CodeRED General” as the contact name. If you need to replay the emergency notification message again, simply dial the number and you will be able to hear the message again.

CodeRED is a service of Emergency Communications Network which takes security and privacy concerns very seriously. They will not sell, trade, lease or loan any data citizen supplied data to third parties.

After you submit the initial registration form, you may start the registration process again and submit more numbers for the same address.

Yes. Fill out the CodeRED registration form but be sure to select the “This address is a business” option. Please note that emergency calls can only be delivered to a direct dial number. Automated attendants will disrupt the process and the calls will not be delivered. Businesses should register their main number and establish a procedure for distributing the CodeRED message to their workforce.

This system is an enhancement to existing means of communication and is meant to supplement current or past systems used for mass notification.

Any message regarding the safety, property or welfare of the community will be disseminated using the CodeRED system. These may include AMBER alerts, notifications of hazardous traffic or road conditions, boil water advisories or evacuation notices.

CodeRED is an emergency notification service that allows emergency officials to notify residents and businesses by telephone, cell phone, text message, email and social media regarding time-sensitive general and emergency notifications. Only authorized officials have access to the CodeRED system.

General

All cases are retained physically and on electronic file with the Oro Valley Police Department’s Records Unit. Active cases will not be released until an arrest is made or the case is closed. If you need a copy of a case, it is generally available for dissemination within 7-10 business days. There is a fee of $5.00 for a case report (10 or less pages); any additional pages are $0.25. We accept cash, money order or a cashier’s check.

Yes. The Oro Valley’s Citizen Volunteer Assistants Program (CVAP) members fingerprint citizens.  For more informcation, please click on Fingerprinting.

Citizen Volunteer Assistants Program (CVAP) provides the opportunity for active adult citizens to serve their community by assisting the Oro Valley Police Department in non-emergency situations.

Volunteers are an effective visual crime deterrent by patrolling residential neighborhoods, business complexes and shopping centers. They provide officers with assistance at accidents, incidents and events. Volunteers routinely help citizens needing directions or assisting after their vehicle breaks down. They utilize a patrol car equipped with a License Plate Reader that detects stolen vehicles, stolen license plates, warrants and missing people. The Volunteers also have members on a call out team that are contacted when patrol officers need their assistance at a scene. They have been called out for incidents including gas leaks, neighborhood evacuations as well as fatal traffic accidents. During Oro Valley events such as El Tour De Tucson, Holiday Parade, Halloween Safe Treats, Arizona Distance Classic, July 4th Celebration and IronKids Triathlon, the Volunteers provide assistance with setup, breakdown and traffic control.

Volunteers can be found assisting in the main police station and the Rancho Vistoso substation. They answer phone calls and assist citizens with general questions and directions. Volunteers assist Community Resource Officers with community presentations and community safety events. They also produce and tabulate Citizen Surveys, which are distributed to citizens by patrol officers, school resource officers, community resource officers and volunteers. The Citizen Survey's statistics are reported quarterly to the Chief’s Advisory Committee and are published on the Department’s website. The Volunteers manage the Police Department’s public fingerprinting program. Other special assignments include assisting the Town’s Fleet Mechanic, computing collision statistics for the Department’s Motor/Traffic Unit, updating the citation sanction envelopes for the Oro Valley Magistrate Court, Video ID and the Darkhouse programs.

The Volunteers are an invaluable resource to the Police Department, the Town and the community. For additional information, please visit our CVAP webpage.

Impounded Vehicles

We must receive your request for a hearing no later than ten (10) days from the date of the vehicle impoundment and may be done by phone.  If your request is received after the ten day time period, we will not grant you a hearing on this matter.
In most cases, you must wait 30 days before you can get your vehicle back.
You can ONLY arrange to have your vehicle released by contacting the Oro Valley Police Department.  The towing company CANNOT release the vehicle back to you without permission from the police department.
In some cases, you may be able to get your vehicle back before the end of the 30 days, but you may still have to pay all fees and charges.

No.  Most people who do not meet one of the exemptions will not request or need a hearing.  If you get your license reinstated before the end of the 30-day period, you may be eligible to have your vehicle returned to you without a hearing.

Generally, hearings are only for the purpose of contesting the impound.  In order to have your vehicle released prior to the 30 days required by law, you must be able to prove that certain special circumstances exist.

The law requires that the vehicles impounded under this law be stored for a period of thirty (30) days before being released.

You may be eligible to have the vehicle released early only if you meet one of the following conditions or circumstances:

  • If the owner presents satisfactory proof that the owner’s driving privilege has been reinstated.  Note:  If this applies to you, a hearing is not needed.  You should simply bring proof that your license is now valid to the Oro Valley Police Department located at 11000 N. La Cañada Drive.
  • If the vehicle was reported stolen at the time it was impounded.
  • If the vehicle is subject to bailment and was being driven by an employee of a business establishment, including a parking service or repair garage, who is subject to ARS 28-3511-A or B.
  • IF ALL THE FOLLOWING APPLY – the owner or owner’s agent was not the person driving in violation at the time of the impound AND the owner or the owner’s agent is in a business of renting motor vehicles without drivers AND the vehicle is registered pursuant to ARS 28-2166.

No, there is no fee or charge for a hearing.

The owner of the vehicle is responsible for paying all fees and charges in order to have the vehicle released.  If someone else was driving, you may have to seek civil action against the driver for any expenses you incur as a result of the impound.

No, an attorney is not needed.  The hearing process is information and rather brief.

The registered owner of this vehicle is liable for towing fees, storage charges of not more than $15.00 per day and administrative fees of up to $150.00.  The administrative fee must be paid to the Oro Valley Police Department in the form of a cashier's check, money order or cash.  No credit cards or personal checks will be accepted.

You must meet the legal title and registration requirements before the vehicle can be returned to you.  This can be done through the Arizona Motor Vehicle Department.  If the vehicle is registered out of state, you must either register the vehicle in Arizona or deal with the state in which it is currently registered.

No.  As long as the officer impounded your vehicle according to the law and our procedures, the outcome of any trial is not relevant.

Under the law, the owner, owner’s spouse, their agent or attorney, or lien holder are the only persons who can have the vehicle released.  If your vehicle was impounded because you did not have a valid license, and your license is still not valid at the end of the 30-day, you can bring someone with you who has a valid license in order to get your vehicle back.

An agent is someone who is legally entitled to act for you, such as your attorney or someone you have given legal power of attorney.  A friend or relative cannot be considered your agent unless they have notarized documentation giving them power of attorney.

Yes.  The owner would have to prove that this had been corrected and their driving privileges reinstated, at which time we will release the vehicle.

Yes.  The owner is still liable for all towing and storage fees up to the actual date of release.

No.  The towing company will not release an impounded vehicle without paperwork from the Oro Valley Police Department.  You must follow the claim process as outlined below.

On or after the 30th day of impound OR if you get your license reinstated earlier, your vehicle will generally be eligible for release to you.  To have it released, follow these steps: 

  • Come to the Oro Valley Police Department at 11000 N. La Cañada Drive between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
  • Bring with you a valid driver’s license, valid registration AND proof of current insurance.  Please note: if your license is suspended, revoked, or cancelled, you may have to go to court or the Motor Vehicle Division first.  Your vehicle registration is invalid if it is expired or cancelled.  We cannot release your vehicle to you until these documents are valid and current.  Note:  if your driving privilege cannot be restored by the end of the 30-day impound period (for example, it has been suspended for one year), you may bring a fully licensed driver with you to drive the vehicle upon release.  You must still have a valid vehicle registration AND proof of current insurance before the vehicle will be released.
  • If the vehicle was impounded due to a motor vehicle accident, proof of current and valid registration, driver’s license and proof of current insurance are required.
  • You must pay the towing and storage fees at the towing company.  Payment is made directly to the towing company.  If you come to the tow yard at other than normal business hours, you may be charged a gate fee.  You must also present proof of your identity and ownership (title or registration) to the tow company.

Yes, but hearings are usually not needed.  Hearings are generally only needed if you are challenging the validity of the impound

If you do want a hearing, you may make a request to the Oro Valley Police Department in writing, in person or by telephone at 11000 N. La Cañada Drive or by calling (520) 229-4900.

Outside Assignments

Patrol

Officers respond to medical calls for service for numerous reasons. While each circumstance is unique, there are common issues addressed on a regular basis. The following are some examples of the police officer’s role and responsibilities when responding to medical calls for service.

Police officers are considered first responders. While police officers do not have the extensive training paramedics have, officers do have training and tools for basic life saving techniques. Because officers are in the community during their shift, they are able to respond quickly. As such, it is not uncommon for a police officer to arrive at a medical call for service before the fire department. This is important to the preservation of life when the patient is not responsive and not breathing. Individual Oro Valley Police Officers have received the Department’s “Life Saving Award” for prolonging life until the paramedics arrive.

The Town of Oro Valley has a significant senior citizen population. Responding to medical calls for service provides an opportunity for officers to look for signs of abuse or neglect. In addition, the citizen may not have family or support to help care for them. It becomes the officer’s responsibility to recognize signs indicating if the citizen is not able to properly care for themselves. In the event this happens, it would be incumbent on the officer to get a social service, such as Adult Protective Services, involved.  Elder Abuse Information

In the unfortunate event that a medical condition was to cause the death of a citizen, there are specific responsibilities that fall on the shoulders of the responding police officer. One of the most difficult tasks is to assist the surviving family members in coping with their loss. The Police Department also has access to resources available to assist with this task. One such resource is the Victim Services Program. The volunteers involved with this program have specific training to help the family with the grieving process. The officer also has the responsibility to conduct an appropriate investigation to ensure there are no signs of suspicious activity. In addition, they are responsible for staying on scene until the remains can be removed.

The Oro Valley Police Department is proud to have an outstanding working relationship with the local fire departments that service Oro Valley residents. When responding to a medical call for service it is the police officers’ responsibility to ensure the paramedics’ safety. For example, when the patient is diabetic, he/she may be extremely emotional and not thinking rationally. Diabetic patients undergoing diabetic shock, which is life threatening, can be very combative. The officer has the training to safely and effectively restrain the patient while the paramedics administer the proper care. In incidents that involve serious medical conditions, family members can be very emotional and sometimes irrational. They can hinder the paramedic’s ability to properly care for the patient and jeopardize the patient’s safety. By speaking with the family member, away from the patient, the officer provides a stable environment for the paramedics to properly care for the patient.